Tag: while

How a couple who were afraid to work for themselves started earning 6 figures while traveling the world

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In 2010, Karen Sargent and Paul Farrugia had $15,000 of savings burning a hole in their pocket.

At first, they thought they would buy a flat in London, where they were living.

However, Sargent remembers, “We’d daydream about traveling, and we decided the money was better spent on travel.” Instead of putting a down payment on a home, the couple left their jobs — Karen, a business psychologist for a business-training company, and Paul in retail — to spend a year traveling from London through Asia by land.

“Six months into our trip,” Sargent says, “we realized a year would not be enough.”

They ended up traveling for 18 months, and today, they’ve built a life that allows them the best of both worlds: Half the year in a London flat and half of the year spent abroad, a lifestyle they chronicle on their website, Global Help Swap, and on their Instagram. They spoke with Business Insider about how they’ve made it work.

SEE ALSO: How one man went from working a soul-sucking 9-5 to earning $10,000 a month online

“In those 18 months, we just loved the sense of freedom,” says Sargent. “I always wanted to be self-employed, but I was afraid of not earning a lot of money.”

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New Years Eve 2012, Sydney Harbour, Australia

However, traversing Europe, Russia, and Mongolia by train, the couple found themselves meeting a lot of people who were of limited means. “With such a small budget, we were poor financially as well, but realized that money doesn’t make any difference with happiness,” Sargent says.

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Meeting some locals in Mongolia.

“When we came back, we both felt freer,” she explains. Looking for a new job, Sargent came across a position as a senior psychologist in Dubai that she knew “would be perfect for me — and my heart sank. I knew I had to try being self-employed.”

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Suzdal is one of the prettiest towns in Russia. If you ever visit Moscow make sure you take some time to visit this ancient town.

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4 things you can literally learn while you sleep

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When you go to sleep tonight, put a book under your pillow. When you wake up tomorrow morning, you’ll have its contents memorized.

OK, so that probably won’t work.

But don’t lose hope just yet: It turns out there actually are a few things you can learn — or at least improve your grasp of — while you snooze. Most of them depend on one thing: sound.

Here are some of the skills you may be able to sharpen in your sleep:

LEARN MORE: There’s a fascinating reason why it feels like it’s gets harder to sleep as you age

DON’T MISS: What too little sleep does to your brain and body

1. Foreign words.

In a recent experiment, scientists had native German speakers start learning Dutch, beginning with some basic vocab. Then they asked them to go to sleep.

Unbeknownst to the dozing Germans, while they slept, the researchers played the sound of some of those basic words to one group of them. The other group was exposed to no such sounds. Later on when they were tested on the words, the group who’d listened to them overnight was better able to identify and translate them.

To make sure the findings were tied to sleep — and not just the result of people hearing the words — they had another group listen to the words while they did something else while awake, like walking. The walkers didn’t recall the words nearly as well as the sleepers.

2. Musical skills.

In another study, researchers taught a group of people to play guitar melodies using a technique borrowed from the video game Guitar Hero. Afterward, all the volunteers got to nap. When they woke up, they all were asked to play the tune again.

Unbeknownst to the sleeping participants, one group was played the same melody they’d just learned as they slept. The other group was not. The volunteers who’d been played the sound while they napped — even though they had no memory of it — played the melody far better than those who didn’t hear it as they snoozed.

3. Where you put something.

In a 2013 study, researchers had 60 healthy adults use a computer to place a virtual object in a particular location on the screen. When they picked a location and placed the object there, they heard a specific tune. Then, they did two experiments in which they had the participants nap for 1.5 hours. During the first nap, participants dozed as usual, with no sounds playing. During the second nap, the tune that was played when they were placing the object was played again — though none of them reported hearing it.

Not surprisingly, after either nap, people’s memories faded. But their memories faded less when they’d been exposed — even sub- or unconsciously — to the sound that had been played when they’d placed the item. Interestingly, their memories were sharper still when they’d been told the virtual object was of “high value.”

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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Chelsea Handler says she learned her most important career lesson while waitressing in her 20s

chelsea handlerChelsea Handler is wildly successful.

In 2006, at age 31, the New Jersey native got her own talk show on the E! network; she’s authored five New York Times bestsellers; she has landed spots on Forbes’ Celebrity 100 and Power Women lists, and was named one of Time’s Most Influential People in 2012.

Most recently, the millionaire comedian and actress explored racism, drugs, marriage, and Silicon Valley in the four-part Netflix docuseries Chelsea Does.”

How did she accomplish all this — and more — by age 40?

She showed up … for almost everything.

In a recent post for LinkedIn‘s latest editorial package, “How I Launched My Career,” Handler, now 41, says she learned the importance of showing up while waitressing in her early 20s. 

I was never the best waitress, but I was always the person people called when they needed a shift covered because I would always say yes,” she writes.

“Whether that was a result of wanting to be liked from years of rejection in high school, or whether it was wanting to be dependable and reliable after years of being the opposite, I just wanted people to feel that they could count on me,” she says in her LinkedIn post, titled “I Used to Hate Doing Stand Up. Then I Discovered the Power of Showing Up.” “I didn’t want to work the extra shifts, [but it] gave me a sense of worth and reliability.”

chelsea stand upLater in life, she says her habit for dependability bled into her stand-up career. “I kept showing up. When there were only two people in the audience … I showed up and did ten minutes of material.” 

She’d also show up to “open mic nights” at coffee houses, which she “absolutely dreaded.” “I hated doing stand-up in the beginning. I couldn’t wait for a set to be canceled because no one showed, but after getting cold feet many times, I made an agreement with myself that I would show up, get up, and do my set, no matter what the circumstance,” she writes.

Once Handler showed up enough times, it became her reality, she says. “It was no longer an option to not show up. I now practice ‘showing up’ with everything I do. It has permeated every facet of my life. Whether it’s wanting to cancel a workout, a friend’s party, a public appearance, my family in New Jersey. Whatever it is, when I commit, I show up.”

And if she really can’t show up for something, she’s honest about it. “I don’t over-explain with an excuse that I’m sick or that my children are sick … because I’m not sick and I don’t have children, and all of those excuses are transparent, and you become unreliable,” she writes.

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She says over the years she’s learned to be selective about what she commits to showing up to.

“I spent the first ten years of my career saying yes to absolutely everything and then harboring resentment for having said yes in the first place,” she writes. Now she focuses on showing up “for the people in my life who deserve my loyalty” — her friends, family, and mentors. 

“Showing up shows great character,” she concludes. “And once you master the art of physically showing up, the art of mentally showing up usually takes care of itself.”

Read more about how to launch your career on LinkedIn.

SEE ALSO: This is the one thing I regret not doing on my first day of work

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